LANL’s sanitary facility can now recycle up to 300,000 gallons of water daily

A SERF-E operator places a microfilter into operation at the facility.

Cutting the ribbon on the expansion of the SERF.

In an effort to process, treat and recycle up to 300,000 gallons of wastewater per day, Los Alamos National Laboratory launched operations at the new expansion of the Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility (SERF-E) with a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier this month.

Each year, LANL produces more than a hundred million gallons of effluent from LANL's sanitary wastewater treatment plant. Instead of being discharged into the environment, the plant pipes the water to the SERF, which treats and reuses it in cooling towers to cool the Strategic Computing Complex.

The facility originally was designed to help LANL meet strict Environmental Protection Agency limits on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) discharge in wastewater and reduce the Laboratory’s use of potable (drinkable) water.

Dino Herrera, the Deputy Associate Deputy Administrator for Infrastructure and Construction, oversaw the project and complimented the team that planned and constructed the facility.

“The SERF-E project went from start to finish in four years,” he said. “This is a model for how line-item projects should function, and I applaud the project team for such a great effort.”

About the photos:

A SERF-E operator places a microfilter into operation at the facility.

Cutting the ribbon on the expansion of the SERF marked the official start of the facility’s expanded operations.  The SERF-E can now treat and recycle up to 300,000 gallons of wastewater each day.

Aug 21, 2012 at 1:00 pm