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April 2013

New simulation speed record set on Sequoia

Computer scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) have set a high performance computing speed record that opens the way to the scientific exploration of complex planetary-scale systems.

In a paper to be published in May, the joint team will announce a record-breaking simulation speed of 504 billion events per second on LLNL’s Sequoia Blue Gene/Q supercomputer, dwarfing the previous record set in 2009 of 12.2 billion events per second.

Sequoia has a peak performance of 25 petaflops and is the second fastest supercomputer in the world, with a total speed and capacity equivalent to about one million desktop PCs. A petaflop is a quadrillion floating point operations per second.

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SRS employees devote time to 'Days of Caring'

Dozens of Savannah River Site employees recently spent time off volunteering at 16 area United Way agencies as participants in this year’s Projects SERVE, CARE and VISION  - part of the “Days of Caring” United Way program at SRS.

Each year a large number of employees commit their day off to projects that will improve the lives of hundreds of disadvantaged children, low-income senior citizens, disabled community members and others. Team projects typically include clearing debris, painting, repairing flooring, putting up drywall, building wheelchair ramps, installing smoke detectors, fixing faulty plumbing and yard work.

About the photo:
Cynthia Williams of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs volunteers at the Salvation Army as part of Project SERVE.

Michelle Racicot, a contract family nurse practitioner at Sandia

Michelle Racicot, a contract family nurse practitioner at Sandia National Laboratories, was one of 14 women recognized by first lady Michelle Obama at the White House as Champions of Change. The event during Women’s History Month honored women veterans who have made a major impact on the nation’s communities, businesses and schools. Hundreds were nominated for the award.

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 Gordon Bell visits Livermore

Researcher emeritus Gordon Bell spoke at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory this week and joked that when it comes to the security badge requirements for getting on site, "nothing has changed since my first visit in 1961."

But when it comes to high performance computing at LLNL, much has changed thanks to the computing technology revolution Bell helped bring about. Bell's presentation, “The Supercomputer Class Evolution: A Personal Perspective,” was a PowerPoint journey through time from LLNL's earliest supercomputing systems in the early 60s to today's era of massively parallel computing systems.

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